Red Giant Star R Sculptoris Ejects 3D Spiral Structure Into the ISM

by HolographicGalaxy.blogspot.com

The first sets of observations using the most powerful new radio telescope, shows a 3D spiral of material coming out from a star, together with a surrounding spherical shaped enveloping shell.  In order to describe the spiral structure, team scientists ran computer gravity simulations using a binary star system, to fit the observations. Planetary nebulae have also been previously described having these “UNSEEN BINARIES” to support a gravitational explanation, even though magnetic fields are proven to be shaping them. No binary star companion for R Sculptoris has ever been detected, yet they claim a very tiny companion star of 0.2 solar mass is most likely shaping the wind into the spiral structure by gravity. New star models will be required to explain this spiral vortex structure, because in every known example these nearby companion binary stars are never found . When ALMA is fully operational in 2013, prepare for the excitement from many new findings of single stars having the same spiral structures. 

Spiral structure beneath the shell of R Sculptoris (left) and the ridiculous binary star simulation (right)

LL Pegasi

LL Pegasi is also a single star, predicted to have a binary companion because it has a similar spiral structure. It appears to lack the outer surrounding spherical shaped envelope shell in older photos, but has not yet been photographed by ALMA. In 2013 (ALMA) Atacama Large Millimeter / Submillimeter Array will be fully completed, and will show full interior 3D structures.

TT Cygni 
TT Cygni is a cool red giant carbon star, mentioned in the paper.

All of these examples are cited in the paper to try and explain the envelopes and spiral structures as produced by an unseen undetected binary star, but the proof is entirely lacking in every case for an existing companion star.

the old red giant star “U Camelopardalis” is a single star that has an outer shell. Its spiral envelope structure will likely be detected in 2013 when the new telescope is completed. 

Common anciently evolved red giant stars are largely responsible for filling the interstellar medium with newly ejected spiral material that will form new nebula and stars.  

Entire Free Paper version
Red Giant R Sculptoris (Nature paper)

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